Ariane Labed : J'ai appris à avoir confiance en mes doutes

 

"J'ai appris à avoir confiance en mes doutes."

Ariane Labed, actrice / réalisatrice

Format Court

 

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Une espèce d'ombre lumineuse | Nietzsche | Knight of Cups, Terrence Malick

 

"Tout à côté des êtres entièrement nocturnes se trouve presque régulièrement, comme enchaînée à eux, une âme de lumière. Elle est pour ainsi dire l'ombre négative qu'ils projettent."

Nietzsche, Humain, trop humain - Le voyageur et son ombre, 258 : Une espèce d'ombre lumineuse

Eine lichte Art von Schatten. — Dicht neben den ganz nächtigen Menschen befindet sich fast regelmässig, wie an sie angebunden, eine Lichtseele. Sie ist gleichsam der negative Schatten, den jene werfen.

Menschliches, Allzumenschliches

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Photo : Knight of Cups, Terrence Malick

 

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Mona Ozouf : Pour Henry James, la vie n'était pas forcément logique et il n'aurait sûrement pas souscrit à l'idée sartrienne que les êtres se confondent avec leurs actes

 

"Le dénouement inconclusif du Portrait de femme et le caractère floconneux de l'avenir d'Isabelle."

"Pour James, la vie n'était pas forcément logique et il n'aurait sûrement pas souscrit à l'idée sartrienne que les êtres se confondent avec leurs actes".

Mona Ozouf, La muse démocratique - Henry James ou les pouvoirs du roman. Editions Calmann-Lévy

 

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Jane Campion : deux forces principales qui me guident : l'excitation de découvrir la vérité des choses et des êtres, où qu'elle se trouve, et le désir d'être aimée

 

Isabel Archer. "Elle est courageuse et à la recherche de la vérité ; c'est ce qui la pousse en avant. Personnellement, je sens en moi, entre autres choses, deux forces principales qui me guident : l'excitation de découvrir la vérité des choses et des êtres, où qu'elle se trouve, et le désir d'être aimée. Ce sont deux compagnons difficiles à concilier".

Jane Campion à Michel Ciment. Venise, 11 septembre  1996

A propos de la sortie du film "Portrait de femme" / The Portrait of a Lady
d'après Henry James
Jane Campion par Jane Campion
Un livre des Editions Cahiers du Cinéma

 

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de la neige et Rooney Mara | Carol | Todd Haynes

 

"une sorte d'année sentimentale"

"de la neige de Paris aux feuilles mortes de Saint-Cloud"

"tout autant que les impressions de lumière ou de parfums qui lui étaient associées"

A la recherche du temps perdu, Marcel Proust

Photo : Rooney Mara et la neige, Carol, Todd Haynes

 

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Le récit de Henry James s'appuie toujours sur la quête d'une cause absolue et absente | Todorov

 

"Le récit de James s'appuie toujours sur la quête d'une cause absolue et absente".

"La recherche d'un tel invariant ne peut se faire qu'en superposant les différentes oeuvres à la manière des fameuses photographies de Galton, en les lisant comme en transparence les unes sur les autres".

Le secret du récit : Henry James
Tzvetan Todorov, Poétique de la prose

Photo :

- I don't understand you.

- It's hard to explain.

The Portrait of a Lady | Jane Campion

 

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You remain with the sense of the life still going on | Joseph Conrad: Henry James: An Appreciation

 

'One is never set at rest by Mr. Henry James's novels. His books end as an episode in life ends. You remain with the sense of the life still going on'.

- Joseph Conrad, Henry James: An Appreciation. North American Review, January 1905

"Personne n'est jamais laissé en repos par les romans de M. Henry James. Ses livres se terminent comme se termine un épisode de la vie. Vous restez avec la sensation que la vie avance encore."

 

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to accept her decisions submissively - which indeed there was already an emotion in doing | The Portrait of a Lady

 

'It would have given him extreme pleasure to be present in person at the modest little feast she had sketched ; but in default of this he liked even being forbidden.For the moment, however, he liked immensely being alone with her, in the thickening dusk, in the centre of the multitudinous town ; it made her seem to depend upon him and to be in his power. This power he could exert but vaguely ; the best exercise of it was to accept her decisions submissively - which indeed there was already an emotion in doing'. - The Portrait of a Lady, Henry James

 

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The house of fiction | Henry James / The Portrait of a Lady | Jane Campion

 

'The house of fiction has in short not one window, but a million--a number of possible windows not to be reckoned, rather; every one of which has been pierced, or is still pierceable, in its vast front, by the need of the individual vision and by the pressure of the individual will. These apertures, of dissimilar shape and size, hang so, all together, over the human scene that we might have expected of them a greater sameness of report than we find. They are but windows at the best, mere holes in a dead wall, disconnected, perched aloft; they are not hinged doors opening straight upon life. But they have this mark of their own that at each of them stands a figure with a pair of eyes, or at least with a field-glass, which forms, again and again, for observation, a unique instrument, insuring to the person making use of it an impression distinct from every other. He and his neighbours are watching the same show, but one seeing more where the other sees less, one seeing black where the other sees white, one seeing big where the other sees small, one seeing coarse where the other sees fine. And so on, and so on; there is fortunately no saying on what, for the particular pair of eyes, the window may NOT open; " fortunately" by reason, precisely, of this incalculability of range. The spreading field, the human scene, is the "choice of subject"; the pierced aperture, either broad or balconied or slit-like and low-browed, is the "literary form"; but they are, singly or together, as nothing without the posted presence of the watcher--without, in other words, the consciousness of the artist. Tell me what the artist is, and I will tell you of what he has BEEN conscious. Thereby I shall express to you at once his boundless freedom and his "moral" reference'.

The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James, 1908 New York Edition, Preface

Photo: The Portrait of a Lady by Jane Campion

 

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I have left her en l'air / relations stop nowhere / the circle within which they shall happily appear to do so | The Portrait of a Lady | Henry James / Jane Campion

 

The obvious criticism of course will be that it is not finished — that I have not seen the heroine to the end of her situation — that I have left her en l'air. — This is both true and false. The whole of anything is never told; you can only take what groups together. What I have done has that unity — it groups together. It is complete in itself — and the rest may be taken up or not, later.

The Notebooks Of Henry James - The Portrait of a Lady

 

Really, universally, relations stop nowhere, and the exquisite problem of the artist is eternally but to draw, by a geometry of his own, the circle within which they shall happily appear to do so. He is in the perpetual predicament that the continuity of things is the whole matter, for him, of comedy and tragedy; that this continuity is never, by the space of an instant or an inch, broken, and that, to do anything at all, he has at once intensely to consult and intensely to ignore it.

Henry James, Roderick Hudson, PREFACE

 

Photo: The Portrait of a Lady, Jane Campion, The End

 

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